clinical sciences | clerkships

Why Baltimore for Clinical Clerkships?

This is where it all began.

Sir William Osler, one of the founders of modern medicine, established the concept of having third and fourth year medical students work with patients in the hospital, pioneering the practice of bedside teaching.  Osler introduced clerkship training at Johns Hopkins Hospital, in Baltimore Maryland.

Today, Trinity School of Medicine students follow the tried and true approach that was established by Sir William Osler and attend weekly Grand Rounds at Johns Hopkins, the same institution where Osler, as physician-in-chief, forever changed the way physicians were taught the practice of medicine. Our network of affiliated teaching hospitals is a testament to that history.

The Clinical Clerkships Team

  • Dr. Paula Dessauer Wilson, MD, MPH| Sr. Associate Dean of Clinical Clerkships
  • Dr. Richard Scott, MD| Dean of Clinical Sciences, Baltimore/D.C., Professor of Surgery
  • Ms. Laura Brown|Clerkship Administrator
  • Dr. Daljeet Saluja, MD|Clinical Chair, Professor of Family Medicine
  • Dr. Peter Geis, MD|Clinical Chair, Professor of Surgery
  • Dr. Majebi Mayor, MD, PC, FACOG, JD |Clinical Chair, Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Dr. Aliya Jones, MD|Clinical Chair, Professor of Psychiatry
  • Dr. Kinjal Sheth, MD|Clinical Chair, Professor of Internal Medicine
  • Dr. Naijla Abdur-Rahman|Clinical Chair, Professor of Pediatrics

Trinity School of Medicine Students Attend Grand Rounds at Johns Hopkins
Trinity students attend grand rounds at Johns Hopkins Hospital

Trinity School of Medicine's clinical rotations are noteworthy among Caribbean medical schools. First, our centralized program has room for every student we admit. If our matriculation numbers expand slightly (and we mean slightly, our dedication to small classes is no joke), so expands our clinical rotation slots to ensure we can always accommodate our students--an unfortunate reality of some Caribbean schools is this is not always the case, and is often one of the uncomfortable truths behind their high attrition rates.

Building on that, our core rotations are localized to the Baltimore, MD area. This not only optimizes our students' ability to network and really get to know a physician community, paving the way for future opportunities, it means students are able to put down roots in one "home base" and focus on their studies. This is crucial for student success. With other schools, time and resources have to be diverted to find the next place to live, learn commuting in a new city, finding the necessities of life. Trinity does away with that with its Baltimore program.  

Baltimore Regional Hospitals 

Baltimore Washington Medical CenterBaltimore Washington Medical Center
Like so many hospitals Trinity works with in Baltimore, the award winning BWMC has a long history of innovation and care. The 293 bed, 700-doctor teaching hospital has been serving the greater Baltimore community for fifty years. Its ED serves 104,000 patients a year, and boasts many noteworthy “centers of excellence,” namely the Aiello Breast Center, Pascal Women's Center, Center for Advanced Fetal Care, Tate Cancer Center, The Vascular Center, Joint Replacement Center, Spine and Neuroscience Center, Wound Healing and Hyperbaric Medicine Center, and University of Maryland centers for diabetes and endocrinology, surgery center, and cardiology.

 

Bon Secours Hospital

Bon Secours Hospital

Bon Secours Hospital is the award winning flagship site of a health system that has been a part of the medical community in Baltimore for nearly 100 years. Consistently ranked a top place to work in the city, it is nationally recognized for community immunization impact and technological adoption.

Northwest HospitalNorthwest Hospital
A community hospital located in Randallstown (right outside the Baltimore Beltway), prides itself on patient engagement, surgical innovation, and an advanced emergency department means Northwest provides a significant volume and quality of care for its moderate size.

Willoughby Beach Pediatrics

Willoughby Beach Pediatrics
A private pediatrics practice run by one of our department chairs, this is a unique opportunity in medical education: a close, daily working environment with regular patients all designed to properly assess and address the medical complexities of child development.

Providence Hospital (D.C.)Providence Hospital (D.C.)
Chartered in 1861 by the Lincoln Administration, Providence Health’s DC hospital is a 408 bed facility with over 500 full time medical providers serving patients on a sprawling 36 acre campus. Fifteen distinct areas of expertise, from behavioral health and primary care, to cardiology and emergent care, provide a unique and versatile environment for any medical student.

Elective Tracks and Residency Success

While Trinity School of Medicine's core rotations are localized to its Baltimore program and there are local electives available, we also offer "elective tracks" in Baltimore, Chicago, and middle Georgia. Why Chicago and middle Georgia? Trinity leadership has deep connections in both locations, but we also want to adhere to the same principles that shape our core rotations: give students a place to call home to let them focus on what matters: their education.

Students are invited, as always, to select their own electives to sharpen their skills and broaden their experiences, but for those that do better in a more structured setting, we provide two other "home base" elective locations in addition to our Baltimore opportunity. These proven, focused elective tracks provide set-electives that are tailored to help guide students into specific residencies. 

Chicago Regional Hospitals

  • Hartgrove Hospital
  • Mt. Sinai Hospital
  • Presence Resurrection Medical Center
  • Swedish Covenant
  • Weiss Memorial
  • Westlake Hospital

Middle Georgia Regional Colony

  • Community Service Board of Middle Georgia
  • Houston Healthcare
  • Dodge County Hospital

IMPORTANT NOTICE TO NON-U.S AND NON-CANADIAN STUDENTS:
In order to complete the Trinity doctor of medicine (MD) degree program, students from outside the U.S. and Canada may need to obtain certain visas in order to undertake all or a portion of the requisite clinical training in the U.S. Additionally, all students from outside the U.S. and Canada wishing to practice in the U.S. or Canada will need certain visas to take one or more segments of the USMLE exams in the U.S. These visas are solely the student’s responsibility to obtain. Trinity School of Medicine understands that as a result of policies and practices adopted by the U.S. State Department, a number of medical students from outside the U.S. and Canada have been unable to obtain the required visas. Students who are unable to obtain the necessary visas will not be able to access clerkships or residency training in the U.S. or Canada but may, with special approval of the Academic Progress Committee and the dean, pursue an alternate pathway to graduation by passing the NBME Basic Comp and the Clinical Sciences Comp at scores required by the School. Core and elective clerkships are available for these students at Milton Cato Memorial Hospital in St. Vincent.