CLINICAL TRANSITION TERM: READINESS, SUPPORT, AND SUCCESS

Clinical Transition Term

The transition from basic sciences to clinical rotations

Trinity’s clinical facilities are located less than 1/3 mile from the Houston Medical Center Campus in Warner Robins, GA, where students have access to state of the art classrooms and private study spaces in an environment that fosters learning. 

The focus of this term is the integration of clinical medicine into basic science knowledge and the understanding of body systems. 

Once students complete the transition term they are well prepared to take and successfully pass USMLE Step 1 and transition into clinical rotations.

All courses are led by top-notch physicians, clinicians and scientists that are leaders in the medical education community, and they are dedicated to the art of teaching medicine.

Trinity faculty are always accessible and student groups embody the team approach to preparing for the rigors of USMLE preparation and clinical skills demonstration.

The Clinical transition term required courses:
Introduction to Clinical and Community Medicine V (CLMD 405)

This course continues integrating clinical medicine with the basic sciences taught in Terms 1-4.  Students participate in case presentations, hospital clinical experiences, and active learning activities to enhance clinical skills demonstration throughout the term in preparation for the objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) at the end of the term with standardized patients.  6 credits

Integrated Systems Review (CLMD 406)

This course is designed to provide students with a review of systems through case presentations and didactic reviews.  It provides active learning activities to reinforce importance of chief complaints leading to the development of differential diagnoses.   6 credits

Methods include
  • Faculty-facilitated preparation through comprehensive reviews that integrate basic science concepts with clinical scenarios and provide formative assessments during these periods.

  • Multiple diagnostic tests administered to assess student readiness with good correlations to USMLE Step 1 performance.

  • Grand rounds style case presentations are undertaken by students.

  • Completion and certification for Basic Life Support (BLS), Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS), and Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS). Students also complete Borne Pathogens (BBP) and Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) certification and recertification which are required for all clerkships in the US.

  • Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE), reviewing and refreshing clinical skills is a primary focus through active learning opportunities. 

  • Review of the undergraduate Entrustable Professional Activities (EPAs) demonstrating preparation for clinical training. This subset of the EPAs developed by the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) focus the student on skills required to begin clerkships.

  • Students work closely with the clerkship coordinator to plan their 3rd year clerkship schedule, a major competitive advantage and boost to quality of life Trinity offers for a hectic time in any medical students' life.

Once students complete the transition term they are well prepared to take and successfully pass USMLE Step 1 and transition into clinical rotations.

All courses are led by top-notch physicians, clinicians and scientists that are leaders in the medical education community, and they are dedicated to the art of teaching medicine. Trinity faculty are always accessible and student groups embody the team approach to preparing for the rigors of USMLE preparation and clinical skills demonstration.

During 3rd and 4th term, my professor taught me to think like a doctor, integrated it for me, which was, as I came to find out, also how I should think for [step] exams. Working with patients and coming up with diagnoses was very important.

"Great focus, great faculty, great interaction; it meant great outcomes. I felt very well prepared in the basic sciences, and was able to approach the Step 1 exam confidently."