The Shortage of Medical Doctors Grows and Medical Deserts Expand Across the U.S.

The Shortage of Medical Doctors Grows and Medical Deserts Expand Across the U.S.

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Trends Capture Urgent Need for Medical Doctors

Year-after-year, reports release information showcasing the significant shortage of medical doctors across the United States. As of June 2020, the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) released its latest findings, and the data is of critical concern. By their estimates, the U.S. will need an additional 54,100 to 139,000 physicians by 2033.

Ongoing research indicates the continued downward trend, and the shortage of medical doctors continues to be of concern across the United States. In addition to the continuing deficit, large portions across the country are classified as medical deserts—common threads of an area labeled as such include inadequate access to one or more medical services. Rural healthcare continues to dwindle, as an estimated 30 million Americans live at least 60 minutes away from a hospital that offers trauma care. 

U.S. continues to Suffer, Medical Deserts Expand

Rural-Health-Map-headerWhile the shortage of medical doctors continues to grow at an alarming rate, the impact tends to be felt hardest in America's rural communities. Metropolitan counties (shaded in blue) have more access to healthcare, and generally attract more doctors, including new ones. On the flip-side, non-metropolitan areas (shaded in green) show rural areas, where access to healthcare is limited to non-existent (in many locations). It's worth noting; these communities offer things that metropolitan regions can not—for example, a slower pace of life, short commutes, with little to no traffic concerns. The cost of living is often much lower versus that of a metropolitan region. Becoming a medical physician in a rural community allows the doctor to get to know their patients while becoming a part of the community-at-large. Finding future doctors, who want to be part of a small town, is one solution which addresses the continuing expansion of medical deserts, and the growing urban-rural divide.

States Most in Need for Primary Care Physicians

The evidence with the shortage of future physicians continues to be very clear. There is a shortage, and an even bigger shortage will exist in the not so distant future. To add to this medical shortfall, an annual report released by the United Health Foundation in February 2020, examines the 20 states most desperate for primary care physicians. 

20 - Louisiana 139.7 primary care physicians per 100,000 patients

19 - Kansas 138.1 primary care physicians per 100,000 patients

18 - North Carolina 134.4 primary care physicians per 100,000 patients

17 - South Dakota 131.4 primary care physicians per 100,000 patients

16 - South Carolina 131.3 primary care physicians per 100,000 patients

15 - Florida 131.3 primary care physicians per 100,000 patients

14 - Oklahoma 131.2 primary care physicians per 100,000 patients

13 - Indiana 127.2 primary care physicians per 100,000 patients

12 - Kentucky 127.0 primary care physicians per 100,000 patients

11 - Arizona 125.8 primary care physicians per 100,000 patients

10 - Georgia 123.9 primary care physicians per 100,000 patients

9 -  Alabama 122.8 primary care physicians per 100,000 patients

8 - Arkansas 122.3 primary care physicians per 100,000 patients

7 - Montana 116.0 primary care physicians per 100,000 patients

6 - Texas 113.5 primary care physicians per 100,000 patients

5 - Wyoming 111.0 primary care physicians per 100,000 patients

4 - Mississippi 110.8 primary care physicians per 100,000 patients

3 - Nevada 107.4 primary care physicians per 100,000 patients

2 - Utah 102.0 primary care physicians per 100,000 patients

1 - Idaho 99.6 primary care physicians per 100,000 patients

Bridging the Gap of U.S. Medical Schools

Attending medical school in the United States is an option for some, but not all. Each year, medical schools across all 50 states collectively receive more qualified candidates than the total sum of available open seats for future students. In fact, 60% of U.S. applicants are rejected. The same is true for Canada; however, the number of qualified applicants well exceeds what the handful of medical schools can accept, for the entire country. If becoming a medical doctor is your calling, now is the time to take action. The shortage of highly trained and qualified doctors continues to grow at an exponential rate each year. The lack of quality medical care in some regions of America continues to be alarming. These collective consequences add to the expansion of medical deserts. 

The Trinity Advantage-1

Trinity's mission is to continue to produce highly qualified medical doctors each year. Our alumni thrive in prestigious residency programs across the U.S. and Canada.

If you're looking for a medical program that will provide you with the support you need and access to the most innovative medical technology, Trinity has the recipe. Our goal is your success, from your first term as a medical student and well beyond.  

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Topics: United States and Canada Doctor Shortage Medical Doctor Shortage Rural Health Caribbean Medical School St. Vincent Medical School Loans Medical Landscape