One of the best kept secrets in Caribbean Medical Schools | Trinity School of Medicine | Drew Muldowney

Drew Muldowney

Recent Posts by Drew Muldowney:

Trinity, Transfers, and the Changing Face of International Medical Schools

There are quite a few medical schools operating in the Caribbean. This has been a source of everything from hope and opportunity to stress and uncertainty over the past half century or so for US and Canadian students. And while we obviously think that we're the best choice for anyone considering an international medical education, we wanted to take an opportunity to discuss a major ally of ours in the fight for quality: The ECFMG. 

Today, we're going to discuss what the Education Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates (ECFMG) actually is and what it isn't. We'll also get into how they're making the Caribbean a better place for students considering an education abroad. (You will be unsurprised to find that Trinity ticks all of their boxes as one of the best schools in the region).

Topics: ECFMG Accredited caribbean medical school Compare Caribbean medical schools great caribbean medical schools trinity school of medicine admissions

Alumni Spotlight: Dr. Mary Anne Brett

Trinity School of Medicine has always prided itself on the strength and ambition of its students. So many future physicians come our way looking for something new; whether that's a unique learning environment built on support and a strong relationship with the faculty, a curriculum with an emphasis on clinical skills and service to patients, or just a true opportunity to live up to their potential. In this next edition of our alumni spotlight, meet Dr. Mary Anne Brett, McMaster undergrad alum, Trinity graduate, and anatomical pathologist in Calgary, AB.

Topics: alumni spotlight Canadian med students residency match Caribbean medical school student success Accredited caribbean medical school Research early clinical experience

A Canadian without a Country: Canada's medical school system forces qualified students abroad, but what comes next?

In Canada in 2017, only 2,617 of the 13,690 applicants were admitted to medical schools. An astonishing 81% of the applicants- many of whom would make phenomenal physicians- found themselves rejected at home. For many people considering medicine, becoming a doctor is a calling. So, a large percentage of those Canadian applicants without a seat looked abroadmost of them to the Caribbean, but some considering Ireland, Australia, and Eastern Europe as well. But, what happens when school is over? In 2018, of the 1,758 international medical graduates (IMGs)- most of whom were Canadians that tried to match back home- only 123 were selected. This is by no means to say that this isn't still a viable path for Canadians, and a fair number of Trinity graduates have matched in places like Ontario, Calgary, British Columbia, Alberta, and Manitoba.  

The point is that the decision to study abroad is a major one, with many factors to consider, from proximity to home, to academic approach, matching, cost, and long term career plans.

Topics: Canadian med students Accredited caribbean medical school alternative to Canadian medical school Options for Canadians for medical school international medical schools student loans for Caribbean medical school OSAP study medicine abroad

Alumni Spotlight: Gabriel Labbad, MD

Trinity School of Medicine has always prided itself on the strength and ambition of its students. So many future physicians come our way looking for something new; whether that's a unique learning environment built on support and a strong relationship with the faculty, a curriculum with an emphasis on clinical skills and service to patients, or just a true opportunity to live up to their potential. 

In this latest edition of our alumni spotlight, meet Dr. Gabriel Labbad. Read about attending Trinity, the opportunities and perspectives he gained from his time there, and his journey from computer science to OB/GYN, and the cutting edge of medical informatics.

Topics: alumni spotlight Graduates of Trinity School of Medicine residency match Accredited caribbean medical school Milton Cato

Trinity's Clinical Edge: Fifth Term, Step-1, and the Transition to Baltimore

Last week, we talked about Integrated Clinical and Community Medicine (ICCM) at Trinity.  We hinted towards the end of that piece that our approach to early, in-depth clinical training during basic sciences culminates in the 5th term.

Today, we're going to explore that and dig into the benefits of more time and responsibility in the hospital, working with the World Pediatric Project, and the final push towards a great score on the USMLE Step-1 exam before heading to clinical clerkships in Baltimore, MD. 

Topics: 5th term world pediatric project step 1 score Step 1 Pass rate usmle clinical clerkships early clinical experience Milton Cato

Trinity's Clinical Edge: An Overview of the ICCM and its Role in Medical Education

When our graduates discuss their time at Trinity (and when preceptors and attendings discuss Trinity students), exceptional clinical preparedness always comes up. This isn't a coincidence.

Trinity School of Medicine graduates have had extensive clinical training that starts in the first term of study. When they leave St. Vincent after their basic sciences and head to Baltimore, Maryland for their clerkship years, Trinity students feel confident, comfortable, and ready to shine when it's time to round with their US counterparts in the hospital. The backbone of this Trinity advantage is the Introduction to the courses of the Introduction to Clinical and Community Medicine (referred to collectively as "the ICCM").

Today, we're providing an overview of what the ICCM is, how it interacts with the core sciences curriculum on campus, and a video interview with popular student mentor, ICCM course director, and office hours marathon man, Jamil Ibrahim, MD. 

Topics: 5th term curriculum Accredited caribbean medical school interview clinical clerkships early clinical experience Medical education

Trinity Announces September 2018 Chancellor's Scholarship Recipient

Trinity School of Medicine is proud to announce first term student Vincent Shieh as this year's Chancellor's Scholarship recipient. The Chancellor's Scholarship is a merit based award open to select recipients of Trinity's Physician, Dean, and President awards
In winning, Vincent is awarded $50,000 disbursed evenly over the ten terms of study. In total, this one scholarship covers nearly 40% of Mr. Shieh's four-year tuition.

We spoke briefly with Mr. Shieh and are proud to share the perspective of this future physician studying at Trinity. We have also included, at the behest of the administration and with Vincent's permission, the paper he submitted to the award committee.  

Topics: Accredited caribbean medical school Trinity students scholarships for medical school

Alumni Spotlight: Oladele M. Oladapo, MD

Trinity School of Medicine prides itself on the strength and ambition of its students. So many future physicians come our way looking for something new; whether that's a unique learning environment built on support and a strong relationship with the faculty, a curriculum with an emphasis on clinical skills and service to patients, or just a true opportunity to live up to their potential.

In this latest edition of our alumni spotlight, meet Dr. Oladapo. Read about emigrating to the US, attending Trinity, the importance of social connections, and his ongoing balance of practice and medical education.

Topics: alumni spotlight Graduates of Trinity School of Medicine residency match Accredited caribbean medical school Milton Cato

Addressing the Ugly Truth about Caribbean Medical Schools: Why They're Not All the Same


Caribbean medical schools have had a complicated history. As schools of opportunity for the 60% of US medical school applicants that find themselves rejected at home, they are a vital and proven path to practicing medicine as a doctor in the US. Nearly 3,000 US IMGs (US citizens that earned their MD in the Caribbean or other parts of the world) match into residencies back home every year, all of whom weren’t even given a chance in the US school system.

With no shortage of qualified people wanting to be doctors, and a marked shortage of doctors, it’s no wonder the Caribbean became an alternate path to success. It's a way to address the needs of these future doctors' communities at home. It also underscores not just an economic demand, but an actual need, for Caribbean medical schools built to train US physicians.

Trinity School of Medicine Welcomes Marc T Zubrow, MD, FACP, FCCP, FCCM

Following the retirement of esteemed team member Paula Dessaur Wilson, MD, Trinity School of Medicine is proud to welcome Marc T Zubrow, MD, FACP, FCCP, FCCM to the Trinity faculty and administration as professor of internal medicine and senior associate dean of clinical clerkships.

Dr. Zubrow will help guide Trinity students during their rotations in Baltimore, Maryland, providing his knowledge and experience on everything from the practical know-how of medicine to developing technology in healthcare and planning for success during the residency match. 

A graduate of University of Pennsylvania and Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia, PA., Dr. Zubrow completed his internal medicine residency at the Lankenau Hospital in Philadelphia. He went on to complete a fellowship in pulmonary medicine at the University of Pittsburgh. He is certified in internal medicine and pulmonary and critical care. 

Dr. Zubrow's thirty year career is built on the foundation of the practice of pulmonary and critical care while always striving to break new ground for the communities he serves. Leadership experience includes serving as director of MICU at Christiana Hospital, ICU at Wilmington Hospital, and many other clinical teams, receiving national recognition for his work.

Prior to joining Trinity, Dr. Zubrow was associate professor of medicine and vice president of tele-medicine at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. In addition to his academic duties, he led the development and implementation of the University of Maryland eCare program, providing critical care coverage to 11 hospitals throughout the state of Maryland. He has also co-authored 50+ scientific papers and abstracts. 

Dr. Zubrow has served as ACCP governor for the state of Delaware as well as on a variety of committees at both local and national levels. He was the chairperson of the tele-ICU committee for the Society of Critical Care Medicine 2012-2013. He is a fellow of the American College of Physicians, American College of Chest Physicians, and American College of Critical Care Medicine. He has been honored with several teaching awards and clinical excellence recognition, as well as being listed in the, "Best Doctors in America." and named by Healthleaders Magazine as one of the "20 People Who Are Meeting Challenges to Make Healthcare Better."

We're proud and excited to have Dr. Zubrow joining our team. At the same time, we want to wish a very fond farewell to outgoing associate dean of clinical clerkships Dr. Dessaur Wilson. Her impact on the students during her time at Trinity in clinical clerkships cannot be over-stated. In the past five years alone, you would be hard pressed to find a single graduate or member of the administration that does not hold Dr. Dessaur Wilson in the highest regard as an educator, mentor, colleague, and dear friend.

Please join us in welcoming Dr. Zubrow and wishing Dr. Dessaur Wilson the absolute best in her retirement. 

Topics: trinity school of medicine Accredited caribbean medical school Caribbean medical school student success clinical clerkships administration