One of the best kept secrets in Caribbean Medical Schools | Trinity School of Medicine

Trinity School of Medicine Holds Latest 5th Term Ceremony

Because of Trinity's rolling admissions process, every start date, January, May, and September, coincides with a 5th term ceremony that sends a coterie of our students away from the St. Vincent campus and off to their clinical rotations in Baltimore, Maryland.

Much like the white coat ceremony and commencement, the 5th term conclusion is marked by a symbolic event signaling to the students and faculty that a phase of their life is concluding as another begins within the larger scope of their training and career. Unlike those events, the focus is much more on student participation and, while no less serious, the event is more informal and celebratory. Read on to join us in sending this group of January starters onto the next phase of their education.

Topics: 5th term m3 Caribbean medical school student success clinical clerkships early clinical experience St. vincent

Trinity Faculty, Leadership at 2018 IAMSE Conference

A major pillar of Trinity's research program is medical education, both in practical implementation and pure theoretical examination of emerging processes. Developing new techniques in the classroom is a constant process of research and development to provide the best possible outcomes for any students. Trinity was founded, and continues to operate, on a principle of earnest constant improvement closely tied to relevant research performed internally and around the world.

In that spirit, earlier this summer, six faculty members and Trinity's Dean Adkison attended the conference of the International Association of Medical Science Educators (IAMSE) in Las Vegas. 

Topics: Research student research academics medical faculty Accredited caribbean medical school

Addressing the Ugly Truth about Caribbean Medical Schools: Why They're Not All the Same


Caribbean medical schools have had a complicated history. As schools of opportunity for the 60% of US medical school applicants that find themselves rejected at home, they are a vital and proven path to practicing medicine as a doctor in the US. Nearly 3,000 US IMGs (US citizens that earned their MD in the Caribbean or other parts of the world) match into residencies back home every year, all of whom weren’t even given a chance in the US school system.

With no shortage of qualified people wanting to be doctors, and a marked shortage of doctors, it’s no wonder the Caribbean became an alternate path to success. It's a way to address the needs of these future doctors' communities at home. It also underscores not just an economic demand, but an actual need, for Caribbean medical schools built to train US physicians.